Prizes

Race, Culture and Equality Working Group Award for Undergraduate Dissertations

The Race, Culture and Equality Working Group would like to recognise research conducted by undergraduate students on any issue related to the geographies of race, racism and equality. The winner will receive a cash prize.

Nominations are requested from Dissertation Supervisors or Heads of Department at any UK Geography department. There is no limit of submissions per institution, but nominated dissertations should not be submitted for consideration for any other RGS-IBG prizes. Students taking joint degrees are eligible to enter for the prize, provided that at least half their course is in Geography. The dissertations should be circa 10,000 words in length and submitted for formal assessment in the current academic year.

Please send the following via email or link (e.g. Dropbox) to Dr James Esson; 1) a single PDF file of the dissertation; 2) a copy of the appropriate departmental dissertation regulations; and 3) contact details for the student (post-September 2019). Nominations should include “RACE UG dissertation submission” as the email subject.

Submissions to: j.esson@lboro.ac.uk (Dr James Esson, Loughborough University)

Deadline: 22 July 2019

 

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Past winners:
(abstracts and pdfs coming shortly)

2017/18 winner – Esther Chidowe, University of Leicester
“Black Hair: Centring the Offline and Online Geographies of Young Black British Women” (PDF)

This study is concerned with black British women’s offline and online hair journeys. Situated within the framework of Afrocentricity, the study seeks to transgress traditional Eurocentric theorisations of African experiences and instead illustrate the weight of an African centred framework when discussing the lived realities of the African diaspora. Embodying afro hair often dictates how one takes up space, whether this is in the school setting, work place or online, afro hair has an inherent geography which signifies ones belonging and identity. By analysing black women’s engagement with the online Natural Hair Movement, this study reveals the fluidity of their identities, which cannot be compartmentalised exclusively to online or offline spaces.

2016/2017 winner – Omar Clarke, University of Nottingham
“Performance, Identity, Spectacle: The Notting Hill Carnival” (PDF)

Drawing on the use of archival, interviews and participant observation methods, this study explores the imaginative geographies that are involved in the Notting Hill Carnival. In doing this, the study adopts the perspective that artistic spectacles are not separate from the realm of power and politics. The paper seeks to explore why Notting Hill is a significant place for the diasporic West-Indian community in Britain. Secondly, the paper assesses how negative imaginative geographies of the event can serve to legitimise greater regulation of the event. In conjunction with this, there is deconstruction of how the commercialisation of the event has impeded on the carnival’s cultural expression. The greater licencing and controlling of the carnival is reflective of significant changes to the processional routes and the freedom that the performers have to express their culture. The study maintains its sensitivity to the sensory practices of the carnival. This allows an uncovering of the battles for the appropriation of space between different types of carnival performers. The study finds that the celebration of the carnival is becoming more fixated on the festivities of the event rather than remembering the deep-heated history associated with its origins. However, with this changing dynamic, increasingly practices of resistance at the local scale helping to keep the origins of the event alive.

2018/19 winner – Tobias Wapshare, University of Manchester
“Encountering difference on the London Underground: an Asian man’s embodied (im)mobility” (PDF)

This paper examines the everyday (im)mobility of young Asian men as they embody their routine commute on the London Underground. Filling an empirical lacuna in the New Mobilities Paradigm, for the first-time research opens the London Underground up to analytical import, exploring the formation of relational geographies on the move and the bodily encounters, affects and racial practices they encompass. Through go-along mobile interviews, research shadows three young Asian men on their daily commute, critically engaging with their individual capacity to affect and be affected by the dynamic sociality of Tube travel. In particular, this paper gives specific attention to how race surfaces on the move, through non-discursive negative affects that transcend space and impact a young Asian man’s experience of the London Underground. It demonstrates how the everyday realities of race come to life in mobile spaces, as they repeatedly position young Asian man as out of place- further (re)constructing a young Asian man’s understanding of ‘self’. In doing so, this paper valorises the London Underground as a crucial site of everyday encounter, mundane racism and identity (re)configuration, through which wider processes of exclusion and belonging are understood.

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